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Terazosin: Drug information

Terazosin: Drug information
(For additional information see "Terazosin: Patient drug information" and see "Terazosin: Pediatric drug information")

For abbreviations, symbols, and age group definitions used in Lexicomp (show table)
Brand Names: Canada
  • APO-Terazosin;
  • PMS-Terazosin;
  • TEVA-Terazosin
Pharmacologic Category
  • Alpha 1 Blocker;
  • Antihypertensive
Dosing: Adult

Note: If therapy is discontinued for several days or more, consider beginning with initial dose and retitrate as needed, due to risk of orthostatic hypotension.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (monotherapy or combination therapy):

Note : In patients with moderate to severe predominant storage lower urinary tract symptoms, use in combination with beta-3 agonist or anticholinergic agent. In patients with a significantly enlarged prostate (prostate volume >30 mL, prostate-specific antigen >1.5 ng/dL, or palpable prostate enlargement on digital rectal exam), use in combination with 5-alpha reductase inhibitor (AUA [Lerner 2021]).

Oral: Initial: 1 mg once daily at bedtime; titrate slowly every few weeks (eg, to 2 mg, then 5 mg, then 10 mg) based on response and tolerability; usual dose: 10 mg once daily; if no response after 4 to 6 weeks of 10 mg once daily, may increase to a maximum dose of 20 mg once daily.

Hypertension

Hypertension (alternative agent):

Note: Not recommended for initial management, but may be considered as additional therapy for resistant hypertension in patients who do not respond adequately to combination therapy with preferred agents (ACC/AHA [Whelton 2018]).

Oral: Initial: 1 mg once daily; titrate gradually, as needed, based on response and tolerability up to 20 mg/day in 1 or 2 divided doses (ACC/AHA [Whelton 2018]). Note: Administration at bedtime may help limit orthostasis.

Ureteral stone(s) expulsion

Ureteral stone(s) expulsion (off-label use):

Note: Consider for use in patients with ureteral stones >5 and ≤10 mm (Campschroer 2018; Hollingsworth 2016). Although most evidence exists for distal ureteral stones, given the low side effect profile of alpha-blockers, may consider use in patients with stones in any location of ureter (AUA/ES [Assimos 2016a]). Additionally, may consider for use after shock wave lithotripsy to help pass stone fragments (AUA/ES [Assimos 2016a]; Oestreich 2020). A uroselective alpha blocker (eg, tamsulosin) may be preferred to decrease risk of hypotension (Koski 2018).

Oral: 2 to 5 mg once daily at bedtime until stone passage or for up to 4 weeks (Campschroer 2018; Gurbuz 2011; Wang 2009).

Dosage adjustment for concomitant therapy: Significant drug interactions exist, requiring dose/frequency adjustment or avoidance. Consult drug interactions database for more information.

Dosing: Kidney Impairment: Adult

No dosage adjustment necessary.

Hemodialysis: 10% dialyzable; supplemental dose not necessary.

Dosing: Hepatic Impairment: Adult

There are no dosage adjustments provided in the manufacturer’s labeling.

Dosing: Pediatric

(For additional information see "Terazosin: Pediatric drug information")

Hypertension

Hypertension:

Note: Current pediatric blood pressure guidelines do not include terazosin for the management of pediatric hypertension; other agents are preferred (AAP [Flynn 2017]).

Children and Adolescents: Limited data available: Oral: Initial: 1 mg once daily typically administered at bedtime; slowly increase dose to achieve desired blood pressure as tolerated; maximum daily dose: 20 mg/day (NHBPEP 2004; NHLBI 2011). Note: If drug is discontinued for longer than several days, consider beginning with initial dose and retitrate as needed due to risk of postural hypotension and syncope.

Dosage adjustment for concomitant therapy: Significant drug interactions exist, requiring dose/frequency adjustment or avoidance. Consult drug interactions database for more information.

Dosing: Kidney Impairment: Pediatric

Altered kidney function: There are no pediatric-specific dosage recommendations. Based on experience in adult patients, no dosage adjustment is likely necessary.

Hemodialysis: Based on adult information, 10% dialyzable; supplemental dose not necessary.

Dosing: Hepatic Impairment: Pediatric

There are no dosage adjustments provided in the manufacturer’s labeling.

Dosing: Older Adult

Avoid use for hypertension treatment (Beers Criteria [AGS 2019]). Refer to adult dosing for other indications.

Dosage Forms: US

Excipient information presented when available (limited, particularly for generics); consult specific product labeling.

Capsule, Oral:

Generic: 1 mg, 2 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg

Generic Equivalent Available: US

Yes

Dosage Forms: Canada

Excipient information presented when available (limited, particularly for generics); consult specific product labeling.

Tablet, Oral:

Generic: 1 mg, 2 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg

Administration: Adult

Oral: Administer at the same time each day.

Administration: Pediatric

Oral: Administer without regard to meals at the same time each day.

Use: Labeled Indications

Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

Hypertension: Management of hypertension. Note: Alpha blockers are not recommended as first line therapy (ACC/AHA [Whelton 2018]).

Use: Off-Label: Adult

Ureteral stone(s), expulsion

Medication Safety Issues
Older Adult: High-Risk Medication:

Beers Criteria: Terazosin is identified in the Beers Criteria as a potentially inappropriate medication in patients 65 years and older due to its high risk of orthostatic hypotension. Avoid use for hypertension treatment (alternative agents have superior risk:benefit profiles) (Beers Criteria [AGS 2019]).

Adverse Reactions

The following adverse drug reactions and incidences are derived from product labeling unless otherwise specified. Adverse reactions reported in adults.

>10%: Nervous system: Asthenia (≤11%), dizziness (9% to 19%), fatigue (≤11%), lassitude (≤11%)

1% to 10%:

Cardiovascular: Orthostatic hypotension (1% to 5%), palpitations (4%), peripheral edema (6%), tachycardia (2%)

Gastrointestinal: Nausea (2% to 4%)

Genitourinary: Impotence (2%)

Nervous system: Drowsiness (4% to 5%), paresthesia (3%), vertigo (1%)

Neuromuscular & skeletal: Back pain (2%), limb pain (4%)

Ophthalmic: Amblyopia (≤1%), blurred vision (≤2%)

Respiratory: Dyspnea (2% to 3%), nasal congestion (≤6%), rhinitis (≤2%), sinusitis (3%)

<1%:

Cardiovascular: Syncope

Endocrine & metabolic: Weight gain

Frequency not defined:

Nervous system: Headache

Miscellaneous: Fever

Postmarketing:

Cardiovascular: Atrial fibrillation

Dermatologic: Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (Speck 2008), lichenoid eruption (Koh 2008)

Genitourinary: Priapism

Hematologic & oncologic: Thrombocytopenia

Hypersensitivity: Anaphylaxis, hypersensitivity reaction

Ophthalmic: Intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (Venkatesh 2007)

Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to terazosin or any component of the formulation

Warnings/Precautions

Concerns related to adverse effects:

• CNS depression: May cause CNS depression, which may impair physical or mental abilities; patients must be cautioned about performing tasks that require mental alertness (eg, operating machinery or driving).

• Floppy iris syndrome: Intraoperative floppy iris syndrome has been observed in cataract surgery patients who were on or were previously treated with alpha1-blockers; there appears to be no benefit in discontinuing alpha-blocker therapy prior to surgery. May require modifications to surgical technique.

• Orthostatic hypotension/syncope: May cause significant orthostatic hypotension and syncope, especially with first dose or first few days of therapy; anticipate a similar effect if therapy is interrupted for a few days, if dosage is rapidly increased, or if another antihypertensive drug (particularly vasodilators) or a PDE-5 inhibitor is introduced.

• Priapism: Priapism has been associated with use (rarely); seek immediate medical assistance for erections lasting longer than 4 hours.

Disease-related concerns:

• Heart failure: In a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, terazosin has been determined to be an agent that may exacerbate underlying myocardial dysfunction (magnitude: moderate) (AHA [Page 2016]).

Other warning/precautions:

• Appropriate use: BPH: Rule out prostatic carcinoma before beginning therapy (many symptoms of BPH and prostate cancer are similar).

Metabolism/Transport Effects

None known.

Drug Interactions

Note: Interacting drugs may not be individually listed below if they are part of a group interaction (eg, individual drugs within “CYP3A4 Inducers [Strong]” are NOT listed). For a complete list of drug interactions by individual drug name and detailed management recommendations, use the Lexicomp drug interactions program by clicking on the “Launch drug interactions program” link above.

Alpha-/Beta-Agonists: Alpha1-Blockers may diminish the vasoconstricting effect of Alpha-/Beta-Agonists. Similarly, Alpha-/Beta-Agonists may antagonize Alpha1-Blocker vasodilation. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Alpha1-Agonists: Alpha1-Blockers may diminish the vasoconstricting effect of Alpha1-Agonists. Similarly, Alpha1-Agonists may antagonize Alpha1-Blocker vasodilation. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Alpha1-Blockers: May enhance the antihypertensive effect of other Alpha1-Blockers. Risk X: Avoid combination

Amifostine: Blood Pressure Lowering Agents may enhance the hypotensive effect of Amifostine. Management: When used at chemotherapy doses, hold blood pressure lowering medications for 24 hours before amifostine administration. If blood pressure lowering therapy cannot be held, do not administer amifostine. Use caution with radiotherapy doses of amifostine. Risk D: Consider therapy modification

Amphetamines: May diminish the antihypertensive effect of Antihypertensive Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Antipsychotic Agents (Second Generation [Atypical]): Blood Pressure Lowering Agents may enhance the hypotensive effect of Antipsychotic Agents (Second Generation [Atypical]). Risk C: Monitor therapy

Barbiturates: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Benperidol: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Beta-Blockers: May enhance the orthostatic hypotensive effect of Alpha1-Blockers. The risk associated with ophthalmic products is probably less than systemic products. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Brigatinib: May diminish the antihypertensive effect of Antihypertensive Agents. Brigatinib may enhance the bradycardic effect of Antihypertensive Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Brimonidine (Topical): May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Bromperidol: May diminish the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Blood Pressure Lowering Agents may enhance the hypotensive effect of Bromperidol. Risk X: Avoid combination

Calcium Channel Blockers: Alpha1-Blockers may enhance the hypotensive effect of Calcium Channel Blockers. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Dapoxetine: May enhance the orthostatic hypotensive effect of Alpha1-Blockers. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Dexmethylphenidate: May diminish the therapeutic effect of Antihypertensive Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Diazoxide: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

DULoxetine: Blood Pressure Lowering Agents may enhance the hypotensive effect of DULoxetine. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Flunarizine: May enhance the therapeutic effect of Antihypertensive Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Herbal Products with Blood Pressure Increasing Effects: May diminish the antihypertensive effect of Antihypertensive Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Herbal Products with Blood Pressure Lowering Effects: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Hypotension-Associated Agents: Blood Pressure Lowering Agents may enhance the hypotensive effect of Hypotension-Associated Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Levodopa-Containing Products: Blood Pressure Lowering Agents may enhance the hypotensive effect of Levodopa-Containing Products. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Loop Diuretics: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Antihypertensive Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Lormetazepam: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Methylphenidate: May diminish the antihypertensive effect of Antihypertensive Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Molsidomine: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Nicorandil: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Nitroprusside: Blood Pressure Lowering Agents may enhance the hypotensive effect of Nitroprusside. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Obinutuzumab: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Management: Consider temporarily withholding blood pressure lowering medications beginning 12 hours prior to obinutuzumab infusion and continuing until 1 hour after the end of the infusion. Risk D: Consider therapy modification

Pentoxifylline: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Pholcodine: Blood Pressure Lowering Agents may enhance the hypotensive effect of Pholcodine. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibitors: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Alpha1-Blockers (Nonselective). Management: Ensure patient is stable on one agent prior to initiating the other, and always initiate combination using the lowest possible dose of the drug being added. When tadalafil is used for treatment of BPH, concurrent alpha 1-blockers are not recommended. Risk D: Consider therapy modification

Prostacyclin Analogues: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Quinagolide: May enhance the hypotensive effect of Blood Pressure Lowering Agents. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Rilmenidine: Alpha1-Blockers may enhance the hypotensive effect of Rilmenidine. Risk C: Monitor therapy

Pregnancy Considerations

Adverse events have been observed in some animal reproduction studies.

Chronic maternal hypertension may increase the risk of birth defects, low birth weight, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and neonatal death. Actual fetal/neonatal risks may be related to duration and severity of maternal hypertension. Untreated hypertension may also increase the risks of adverse maternal outcomes, including gestational diabetes, myocardial infarction, preeclampsia, stroke, and delivery complications (ACOG 203 2019).

Agents other than terazosin are more commonly used to treat hypertension in pregnancy (ACOG 203 2019; ESC [Regitz-Zagrosek 2018]). Females with preexisting hypertension may continue their medication during pregnancy unless contraindications exist (ESC [Regitz-Zagrosek 2018]).

Breastfeeding Considerations

It is not known if terazosin is present in breast milk.

The manufacturer recommends that caution be exercised when administering terazosin to breastfeeding women.

Monitoring Parameters

Standing and sitting/supine BP, especially following the initial dose at 2 to 4 hours following the dose and thereafter at the trough point to ensure adequate control throughout the dosing interval.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia: International Prostate Symptom Score (baseline and 4 to 12 weeks after treatment initiation); urinalysis (baseline); objective and subjective signs of relief of benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms (AUA [Lerner 2021]).

Hypertension: The 2017 Guideline for the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults (ACC/AHA [Whelton 2018]):

Confirmed hypertension and known CVD or 10-year ASCVD risk ≥10%: Target blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg is recommended.

Confirmed hypertension without markers of increased ASCVD risk: Target blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg may be reasonable.

Mechanism of Action

Alpha1-specific blocking agent with minimal alpha2 effects; this allows peripheral postsynaptic blockade, with the resultant decrease in arterial tone, while preserving the negative feedback loop which is mediated by the peripheral presynaptic alpha2-receptors; terazosin relaxes the smooth muscle of the bladder neck, thus reducing bladder outlet obstruction

Pharmacokinetics

Onset of action: Antihypertensive effect: 15 minutes; Peak effect: Antihypertensive effect: 2 to 3 hours

Duration of action: Antihypertensive effect: 24 hours

Absorption: Rapid and complete

Protein binding: 90% to 94%

Metabolism: Hepatic; minimal first-pass

Half-life elimination: ~12 hours

Time to peak, plasma: ~1 hour; delayed ~40 minutes with food

Excretion: Feces (~60%, ~20% as unchanged drug); urine (~40%, ~10% as unchanged drug)

Pharmacokinetics: Additional Considerations

Older adult: Plasma clearance was decreased by 31.7% and half-life was 14 hours in patients ≥70 years.

Pricing: US

Capsules (Terazosin HCl Oral)

1 mg (per each): $1.61

2 mg (per each): $1.61

5 mg (per each): $1.61

10 mg (per each): $1.61

Disclaimer: A representative AWP (Average Wholesale Price) price or price range is provided as reference price only. A range is provided when more than one manufacturer's AWP price is available and uses the low and high price reported by the manufacturers to determine the range. The pricing data should be used for benchmarking purposes only, and as such should not be used alone to set or adjudicate any prices for reimbursement or purchasing functions or considered to be an exact price for a single product and/or manufacturer. Medi-Span expressly disclaims all warranties of any kind or nature, whether express or implied, and assumes no liability with respect to accuracy of price or price range data published in its solutions. In no event shall Medi-Span be liable for special, indirect, incidental, or consequential damages arising from use of price or price range data. Pricing data is updated monthly.

Brand Names: International
  • Adecur (CR, DO, GT, HN, MX, NI, PA, PY, SV);
  • Alfaprost (ES);
  • Andrin (PY);
  • Benaprost (AR);
  • Conmy (MY, PH, TW);
  • Dysalfa (FR);
  • Eglidon (AR);
  • Flotrin (DE);
  • Hykor (PH);
  • Hyron (HU);
  • Hytracin (JP);
  • Hytrin (AU, BB, BE, BM, BR, BS, BZ, CL, CN, CO, CR, CY, CZ, DK, DO, EC, GB, GR, GT, GY, HK, HN, HU, ID, IE, IL, IN, JM, KR, LK, LU, MT, MX, MY, NI, NL, NZ, PA, PH, PK, PL, PR, PT, SR, SV, TH, TR, TT, TW, UY, VE, VN, ZA);
  • Hytrin BPH (CH);
  • Hytrine (FR);
  • Hytrinex (SE);
  • Hytroz (ID);
  • Hyzin (PH);
  • Itrin (AE, EG, IT, JO, KW, SA);
  • Kinzosin (TW);
  • Kornam (RU);
  • Kozosin (HK);
  • Lontencin (PH);
  • Mayul (ES);
  • Olyster (IN);
  • Prostera (PH);
  • Prostol (BD);
  • Ralsin (MY);
  • Rosyn (BD);
  • Setegis (HU, RU, UA);
  • Sinalfa (DK, NO);
  • Sinraz (EG);
  • Sutif (ES);
  • Terablock (DE);
  • Teracin (EG);
  • Teradrin (TW);
  • Teragen (KR);
  • Teralfa (IN);
  • Terapam (KR);
  • Terasin (MY);
  • Terastat (JO);
  • Terazon (BD);
  • Terazopress (EG);
  • Terazosab (BE);
  • Tracin (KR);
  • Trasin (BD);
  • Tructum (CO);
  • Vasomet (JP);
  • Vicard (AT);
  • Zytrin (IN)


For country code abbreviations (show table)
  1. 2019 American Geriatrics Society Beers Criteria Update Expert Panel. American Geriatrics Society 2019 updated AGS Beers Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in older adults. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2019;67(4):674-694. doi: 10.1111/jgs.15767. [PubMed 30693946]
  2. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). ACOG practice bulletin no. 203: chronic hypertension in pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2019;133(1):e26-e50. [PubMed 30575676]
  3. Assimos D, Krambeck A, Miller NL, et al. Surgical management of stones: American Urological Association/Endourological Society guideline, PART I. J Urol. 2016a;196(4):1153-1160. doi:10.1016/j.juro.2016.05.090 [PubMed 27238616]
  4. Assimos D, Krambeck A, Miller NL, et al. Surgical management of stones: American Urological Association/Endourological Society guideline, part II. J Urol. 2016b;196(4):1161-1169. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.05.091 [PubMed 27238615]
  5. Campschroer T, Zhu X, Vernooij RW, Lock MT. Alpha-blockers as medical expulsive therapy for ureteral stones. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2018;4:CD008509. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD008509.pub3 [PubMed 29620795]
  6. Flynn JT, Kaelber DC, Baker-Smith CM, et al; Subcommittee on Screening and Management of High Blood Pressure in Children. Clinical practice guideline for screening and management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2017;140(3):e20171904. doi:10.1542/peds.2018-1739 [PubMed 30177515]
  7. Go AS, Bauman M, King SM, et al. An effective approach to high blood pressure control: a science advisory from the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [published online November 15, 2013]. Hypertension. [PubMed 24243703]
  8. Gurbuz MC, Polat H, Canat L, Kilic M, Caskurlu T. Efficacy of three different alpha 1-adrenergic blockers and hyoscine N-butylbromide for distal ureteral stones. Int Braz J Urol. 2011;37(2):195-200. [PubMed 21557836]
  9. Hollingsworth JM, Canales BK, Rogers MA, et al. Alpha blockers for treatment of ureteric stones: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ. 2016;355:i6112. doi:10.1136/bmj.i6112 [PubMed 27908918]
  10. James PA, Oparil S, Carter BL, et al. 2014 Evidence-Based Guideline for the Management of High Blood Pressure in Adults: Report From the Panel Members Appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8) [published online December 18, 2013]. JAMA. [PubMed 24352797]
  11. Koh MJ, Seah PP, Tay YK, Mancer K. Lichenoid drug eruption to terazosin. Br J Dermatol. 2008;158(2):426-427. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.2007.08331.x [PubMed 18047505]
  12. Koski RR, Zufall WH. Efficacy and safety of alpha-blockers for kidney stones in adults. J Pharm Technol. 2018;34(2):54-61. doi:10.1177/8755122517750398 [PubMed 34860948]
  13. Lerner LB, McVary KT, Barry MJ, et al. Management of lower urinary tract symptoms attributed to benign prostatic hyperplasia: AUA guideline part I-initial work-up and medical management. J Urol. 2021;206(4):806-817. doi:10.1097/JU.0000000000002183 [PubMed 34384237]
  14. "Major Cardiovascular Events in Hypertensive Patients Randomized to Doxazosin vs Chlorthalidone: The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). ALLHAT Collaborative Research Group," JAMA, 2000, 283(15):1967-75. [PubMed 10789664]
  15. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, “Expert Panel on Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents,” Clinical Practice Guidelines, 2011, National Institutes of Health. Available at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/guidelines/cvd_ped/peds_guidelines_full.pdf.
  16. National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents, “The Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents,” Pediatrics, 2004, 114(2 Suppl 4th report):555-76. [PubMed 15286277]
  17. Oestreich MC, Vernooij RW, Sathianathen NJ, et al. Alpha-blockers after shock wave lithotripsy for renal or ureteral stones in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2020;11(11):CD013393. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD013393.pub2 [PubMed 33179245]
  18. Page RL 2nd, O'Bryant CL, Cheng D, et al; American Heart Association Clinical Pharmacology and Heart Failure and Transplantation Committees of the Council on Clinical Cardiology; Council on Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. Drugs That May Cause or Exacerbate Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association [published correction appears in Circulation. 2016;134(12):e261]. Circulation. 2016;134(6):e32-e69. [PubMed 27400984]
  19. Regitz-Zagrosek V, Roos-Hesselink JW, Bauersachs J, et al. 2018 ESC Guidelines for the management of cardiovascular diseases during pregnancy. Eur Heart J. 2018;39(34):3165-3241. [PubMed 30165544]
  20. Speck LM, Wilkerson MG, Perri AJ, Kelly BC. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by terazosin hydrochloride. J Drugs Dermatol. 2008;7(4):395-397. [PubMed 18459523]
  21. Terazosin hydrochloride [prescribing information]. East Brunswick, NJ: Avet Pharmaceuticals Inc; August 2021.
  22. Terazosin hydrochloride [summary of product characteristics]. Middlesex, UK: Accord Healthcare Limited; December 2017.
  23. Venkatesh R, Veena K, Gupta S, Ravindran RD. Intraoperative floppy iris syndrome associated with terazosin. Indian J Ophthalmol. 2007;55(5):395-396. doi:10.4103/0301-4738.33835 [PubMed 17699957]
  24. Wang CJ, Huang SW, Chang CH. Adjunctive medical therapy with an alpha-1A-specific blocker after shock wave lithotripsy of lower ureteral stones. Urol Int. 2009;82(2):166-169. [PubMed 19322003]
  25. Weber MA, Schiffrin EL, White WB, et al, Clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypertension in the community: a statement by the American Society of Hypertension and the International Society of Hypertension. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2014;16(1):14-26. [PubMed 24341872]
  26. Whelton PK, Carey RM, Aronow WS, et al. 2017 ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA guideline for the prevention, detection, evaluation, and management of high blood pressure in adults: executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on clinical practice guidelines. Hypertension. 2018;71(6):1269-1324. doi:10.1161/HYP.0000000000000066 [PubMed 29133354]
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